First Cork LSA 50 Years

50th Anniversary of Bahá’í Local Assembly in Cork

50 Years of Bahá’í Local Assembly in Cork

50 Years of Bahá’í Local Assembly in Cork

50 Years of Bahá’í Local Assembly in Cork

In April this year, Taoiseach, Mr. Micheál Martin, wrote to the Bahá’ís of Cork congratulating them on the celebration of the 50th anniversary of the establishment of their first elected local Bahá’í Assembly.

“The work you do”, the Taoiseach said in his message to the Bahá’ís of Cork, “in contributing to the common goal of serving humanity and endeavouring to live in accordance with the teachings of the founder your Faith, Bahá’u’lláh, has had a positive impact on the community of Cork.”

This was a momentous occasion for the Cork Baha'i community.  As there is no clergy in the Bahá’í Faith and instead its community affairs are managed by elected administrative bodies these Assemblies are a central part of Baha'i community life. The Cork Local Assembly has continued in existence ever since, serving the needs of a growing community.

In April this year, Taoiseach, Mr. Micheál Martin, wrote to the Bahá’ís of Cork congratulating them on the celebration of the 50th anniversary of the establishment of their first elected local Bahá’í Assembly.

“The work you do”, the Taoiseach said in his message to the Bahá’ís of Cork, “in contributing to the common goal of serving humanity and endeavouring to live in accordance with the teachings of the founder your Faith, Bahá’u’lláh, has had a positive impact on the community of Cork.”

This was a momentous occasion for the Cork Baha'i community.  As there is no clergy in the Bahá’í Faith and instead its community affairs are managed by elected administrative bodies these Assemblies are a central part of Baha'i community life. The Cork Local Assembly has continued in existence ever since, serving the needs of a growing community.

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The First Connection between Cork and the Bahá'í Faith

The first connection between the Bahá’í Faith and Cork goes back much further than the 1970’s. The American Consul to Cobh (then Queenstown) from 1906 to 1910, Henry Culver, became a Bahá’í just prior to taking up his post in Ireland. Henry and his wife Mary (along with their three youngest children) were domiciled in the Upper Park area of Cobh at a time when the small port town was a bustling hive of comings and goings. 

Henry, a career diplomat, had plenty to do as America’s man in Cobh, tending to the needs of emigrants, sailors and navy personnel. He was known as a fine public speaker and possessed of “remarkable social qualities and a splendid personal presence.” The Culvers are recorded as the first Bahá’ís to live in Ireland.

 

The First Connection between Cork and the Bahá'í Faith

The first connection between the Bahá’í Faith and Cork goes back much further than the 1970’s. Between 1906 and 1910 the Henry Culver, the American Consul to Cobh (then Queenstown) and his wife Mary (along with their three youngest children) came to live in the Upper Park area of Cobh.  Henry had become a Bahá'í just prior to taking up his post in Ireland.

At this time the small port town was a bustling hive of comings and goings and Henry, a career diplomat, had plenty to do as America’s man in Cobh, tending to the needs of emigrants, sailors and navy personnel. He was known as a fine public speaker and possessed of “remarkable social qualities and a splendid personal presence.” The Culvers are recorded as the first Bahá’ís to live in Ireland. 

The First Connection between Cork and the Bahá'í Faith

The first connection between the Bahá’í Faith and Cork goes back much further than the 1970’s. The American Consul to Cobh (then Queenstown) from 1906 to 1910, Henry Culver, became a Bahá’í just prior to taking up his post in Ireland. Henry and his wife Mary (along with their three youngest children) were domiciled in the Upper Park area of Cobh at a time when the small port town was a bustling hive of comings and goings. 

Henry, a career diplomat, had plenty to do as America’s man in Cobh, tending to the needs of emigrants, sailors and navy personnel. He was known as a fine public speaker and possessed of “remarkable social qualities and a splendid personal presence.” The Culvers are recorded as the first Bahá’ís to live in Ireland.

The First Connection between Cork and the Bahá'í Faith

The first connection between the Bahá’í Faith and Cork goes back much further than the 1970’s. The American Consul to Cobh (then Queenstown) from 1906 to 1910, Henry Culver, became a Bahá’í just prior to taking up his post in Ireland. Henry and his wife Mary (along with their three youngest children) were domiciled in the Upper Park area of Cobh at a time when the small port town was a bustling hive of comings and goings. 

Henry, a career diplomat, had plenty to do as America’s man in Cobh, tending to the needs of emigrants, sailors and navy personnel. He was known as a fine public speaker and possessed of “remarkable social qualities and a splendid personal presence.” The Culvers are recorded as the first Bahá’ís to live in Ireland.

The First Irish Bahá'í

The first Irish person to become a Bahá'í was the writer and former Church of Ireland Archdeacon of Clonfert, George Townshend, whose forbears hailed from Casteltownshend in Co. Cork. In the late 1940’s, the Townshend family became the centre of the development of the first Bahá’í community in Dublin.

George became a figure of international repute in his new found religion. His books and poems have been translated into many different languages and he is regarded as a figure of importance in the development of the community in both Britain and Ireland.

The First Irish Bahá'í

The first Irish person to become a Bahá'í was the writer and former Church of Ireland Archdeacon of Clonfert, George Townshend, whose forbears hailed from Casteltownshend in Co. Cork. In the late 1940’s, the Townshend family became the centre of the development of the first Bahá’í community in Dublin.

George became a figure of international repute in his new found religion. His books and poems have been translated into many different languages and he is regarded as a figure of importance in the development of the community in both Britain and Ireland.

The First Irish Bahá'í

The first Irish person to become a Bahá'í was the writer and former Church of Ireland Archdeacon of Clonfert, George Townshend, whose forbears hailed from Casteltownshend in Co. Cork. In the late 1940’s, the Townshend family became the centre of the development of the first Bahá’í community in Dublin.

George became a figure of international repute in his new found religion. His books and poems have been translated into many different languages and he is regarded as a figure of importance in the development of the community in both Britain and Ireland.

The First Irish Bahá'í

The first Irish person to become a Bahá'í was the writer and former Church of Ireland Archdeacon of Clonfert, George Townshend, whose forbears hailed from Casteltownshend in Co. Cork. In the late 1940’s, the Townshend family became the centre of the development of the first Bahá’í community in Dublin.

George became a figure of international repute in his new found religion. His books and poems have been translated into many different languages and he is regarded as a figure of importance in the development of the community in both Britain and Ireland.

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A Bahá'í Community in Cork

The Australian Bahá’í artist, Maude Bennett, made her home in Cork during the middle decades of the twentieth century, setting up home on Hop Island in the Lee estuary. Maude was well known as a watercolourist and had a number of high profile exhibitions in Cork, including one in the City Hall. 

Maude’s paintings hung in many of the ‘big houses’ throughout the county and she was much sought after as a teacher. Amongst her students was a young David Goldberg whose work is included in a number of significant collections at home and abroad. Maude died in 1972 and is interred in the small Church of Ireland cemetery in Douglas. 

A Bahá'í Community in Cork

The Australian Bahá’í artist, Maude Bennett, made her home in Cork during the middle decades of the twentieth century, setting up home on Hop Island in the Lee estuary. Maude was well known as a watercolourist and had a number of high profile exhibitions in Cork, including one in the City Hall. 

Maude’s paintings hung in many of the ‘big houses’ throughout the county and she was much sought after as a teacher. Amongst her students was a young David Goldberg whose work is included in a number of significant collections at home and abroad. Maude died in 1972 and is interred in the small Church of Ireland cemetery in Douglas. 

A Bahá'í Community in Cork

The Australian Bahá’í artist, Maude Bennett, made her home in Cork during the middle decades of the twentieth century, setting up home on Hop Island in the Lee estuary. Maude was well known as a watercolourist and had a number of high profile exhibitions in Cork, including one in the City Hall. 

Maude’s paintings hung in many of the ‘big houses’ throughout the county and she was much sought after as a teacher. Amongst her students was a young David Goldberg whose work is included in a number of significant collections at home and abroad. Maude died in 1972 and is interred in the small Church of Ireland cemetery in Douglas. 

A Bahá'í Community in Cork

The Australian Bahá’í artist, Maude Bennett, made her home in Cork during the middle decades of the twentieth century, setting up home on Hop Island in the Lee estuary. Maude was well known as a watercolourist and had a number of high profile exhibitions in Cork, including one in the City Hall. 

Maude’s paintings hung in many of the ‘big houses’ throughout the county and she was much sought after as a teacher. Amongst her students was a young David Goldberg whose work is included in a number of significant collections at home and abroad. Maude died in 1972 and is interred in the small Church of Ireland cemetery in Douglas. 

In the late 1960’s and early 1970’s the retired English theatrical Bahá’í couple, John and Val Morley moved to Ireland and became mainstays of the famous Loft Shakespearean Theatre company in Cork. Their contribution to theatre in Cork is still fondly remembered.  It was during these years that some local Corkonians enrolled as Bahá’ís and a varied group with respect to age and background established the first Bahá’í Local Assembly of Cork in 1971. Since then, many Bahá’ís have been happy to call Cork home and have been involved in every sphere of life in the city and county.

 

In the late 1960’s and early 1970’s the retired English theatrical Bahá’í couple, John and Val Morley moved to Ireland and became mainstays of the famous Loft Shakespearean Theatre company in Cork. Their contribution to theatre in Cork is still fondly remembered.  It was during these years that some local Corkonians enrolled as Bahá’ís and a varied group with respect to age and background established the first Bahá’í Local Assembly of Cork in 1971. Since then, many Bahá’ís have been happy to call Cork home and have been involved in every sphere of life in the city and county.

Amongst the other messages sent to congratulate the Cork Bahá'í community on the 50th anniversary of the election of their Local Assembly were messages from Simon Coveney, Minister for Foreign Affairs.

Amongst the other messages sent to congratulate the Cork Bahá'í community on the 50th anniversary of the election of their Local Assembly were messages from Simon Coveney, Minister for Foreign Affairs.

This is just a short note to all in Cork Baha’i to congratulate you on 50 years of service to the community. Can I wish you the very best for tonight’s gathering, online, like so many other events we have had over the last year. I know the last year has been tough on so many of us, but we are looking to better days ahead.

I also think this pandemic has brought our people closer together, as Baha’u’llah once wrote “The earth is but one country, and mankind its citizens”. Your contribution to life and society in Ireland and around the globe has been one of positive service and active contribution.

May I wish you the very best for the year ahead, to continue in pursuing these goals, and if I can every be of any help with anything, please do not hesitate to contact me.

Best wishes,

Simon

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The Lord Mayor of Cork, Councillor Joe Kavanagh also sent a video message to the Cork Bahá'í community on the occasion of their 50th anniversary celebration - 

The Lord Mayor of Cork, Councillor Joe Kavanagh also sent a video message to the Cork Bahá'í community on the occasion of their 50th anniversary celebration - 

Noreen McNamara, Secretary of the 2021 Cork Local Assembly enthusiastically welcomed all the warm messages and congratulations received by the Cork community. "It is so lovely to receive these messages and good wishes," Ms. McNamara said, "The Bahá'is of Cork are committed to contributing to the life of the city.  So, I suppose, all we can say is that we are looking forward to the next fifty years!" 

© 178 / 2021 | National Spiritual Assembly of The Bahá'ís of Ireland | info@bahai.ie (01) 6683 150 | CHY 05920

© 178 / 2021 | National Spiritual Assembly of The Bahá'ís of Ireland | info@bahai.ie (01) 6683 150 | CHY 05920

© 178 / 2021 | National Spiritual Assembly of The Bahá'ís of Ireland | info@bahai.ie | (01) 6683 150 | CHY 05920

© 178 / 2021 | National Spiritual Assembly of The Bahá'ís of Ireland | info@bahai.ie | (01) 6683 150 | CHY 05920